Attempt to replace a disk: Unable to GPT format the disk "sdb": Warning! Read error 5; strange behavior now likely!

Hello,

I had a WD Red pro+ disk showing some sector faults so I RMA’ed it and ran my ZFS RAIDZ2 pool degraded for a week. When I go to Storage → Manage Davies (of my pool) I see what believe the old drive is. I click it, hit replace, select the new drive under member disk and check force and I get this error:

Error: [EFAULT] Unable to GPT format the disk "sdb": Warning! Read error 5; strange behavior now likely! Warning: Partition table header claims that the size of partition table entries is 0 bytes, but this program supports only 128-byte entries. Adjusting accordingly, but partition table may be garbage. Warning! Read error 5; strange behavior now likely! Warning: Partition table header claims that the size of partition table entries is 0 bytes, but this program supports only 128-byte entries. Adjusting accordingly, but partition table may be garbage. Unable to save backup partition table! Perhaps the 'e' option on the experts' menu will resolve this problem. Warning! An error was reported when writing the partition table! This error MIGHT be harmless, or the disk might be damaged! Checking it is advisable. 

What am I doing wrong here?

I try to always burn in a new disk before using it

I understand the desire to put a disk in the system as soon as possible… and I would to.

But sometimes disks can arrive DOA. And by testing the disk when burning it in you can avoid trying to add a DOA disk to a pool.

You probably want to verify that you can actually write to the disk. And the burn in procedure would do that.

That makes sense. I’m referencing this post and trying to get some SMART tests going from the web GUI Storage->Manage Disks-> Expanding the new drive → Manual Tests

Every test I try to run gives me an error:

Read SMART Data failed: scsi error badly formed scsi parameters

Do I have a DOA drive?

Probably.

Try testing it in a different machine.

It’s also possible to have another issue. Before declaring the drive dead I would at least power cycle the system.

And if you don’t want to do that test on a different system. Hence my suggestion above :wink:

The disk is showing up in my windows machine but acting funny. When I try to initialize it I get an I/O device error. This is using the same power connector and sATA connector that I’ve confirmed is working. I guess a DOA replacement disk? What the heck WD?

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